American Heart Association

Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED. Updated with 2015 CPR & ECC Guidelines

The latest science says quick action, quality training, use of mobile technology, and coordinated efforts can increase survival from cardiac arrest, a leading cause of death in the United States. The 2015 Guidelines recommend training to develop better systems of care, especially in the event of a cardiac arrest. Everyone should know what to do at every step of a cardiovascular emergency. Effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.

AHA’s Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED course provides the knowledge and skills that may help save a life. It also offers the basics of first aid for the most common life-threatening emergencies, covering how to recognize them, how to call for help, and how to perform lifesaving skills.

Heartsaver courses from AHA offer: a cohesive, consistent experience for the learner, best practices to give students the best possible learning experience and help them better retain information, enhanced and realistic scenarios, while providing course and content flexibility.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE?

Heartsaver courses are intended for anyone with little or no medical training who needs a course completion card for job, regulatory (e.g., OSHA), or other requirements. These courses can also be taken by anyone who wants to be prepared for an emergency in any setting.

COURSE COVERS

  • Adult CPR and AED Use
  • Opioid-associated Life-threatening Emergencies
  • Child CPR and AED Use
  • Infant CPR
  • First Aid Basics
  • Choking in an Adult, Child or Infant


AHA’s BLS Course provides the foundation for saving lives after cardiac arrest. Updated to reflect new 2015 science, BLS teaches the concepts of high-quality CPR, improvement of chest compression fraction, and high-performing team dynamics.

BLS from AHA offers the advantages of: ~ Content representing the latest resuscitation science for improved patient outcomes ~ Realistic scenarios, simulations, and animations depicting rescuers, teams, and patients ~ Course and content flexibility for AHA Instructors and students, including adaptability to local protocols.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE?

Healthcare professionals and other personnel who need to know how to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills in a wide variety of in-facility and prehospital settings.

COURSE COVERS

  • New science and education from the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC
  • The components of high-quality CPR for adults, children, and infants
  • The AHA Chain of Survival for prehospital and in-facility providers
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device
  • Importance of teams in multirescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multirescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants


AHA’s ACLS Course has been updated to reflect new science in the 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC). This course builds on the foundation of lifesaving BLS skills, emphasizing the importance of continuous, high-quality CPR.

This advanced course highlights the importance of high-performance team dynamics and communication, systems of care, recognition and intervention of cardiopulmonary arrest, immediate post-cardiac arrest, acute dysrhythmia, stroke, and acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE?

Healthcare professionals who either direct or participate in the management of cardiopulmonary arrest or other cardiovascular emergencies. This includes personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care, and critical care units such as physicians, nurses, and paramedics.

• Basic life support skills, including effective chest compressions, use of a bag-mask device, and use of an AED • Recognition and early management of respiratory and cardiac arrest • Recognition and early management of peri-arrest conditions such as symptomatic bradycardia • Airway management • Related pharmacology • Management of ACS and stroke • Effective communication as a member and leader of a resuscitation team



Ill or injured children/infants often hide or compensate for symptoms that could quickly become life-threatening. To prevent decline of these pediatric patients, providers must be able to quickly diagnose the underlying cause, treat the symptoms, and closely monitor the patient.

In the AHA’s advanced pediatric course, students learn how to use a systematic approach to quickly assess, identify the underlying cause, and treat pediatric patients in emergency situations. Students interact with real pediatric patient cases, realistic simulations, and animations to assess and treat these pediatric patients. This includes applying basic life support, following PALS treatment algorithms, and practicing effective resuscitation skills and team dynamics. Through a combination of cognitive learning and psychomotor skills practice, the PALS Course improves students’ confidence and skill levels for delivering effective emergency pediatric care.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE?

Healthcare providers who either direct or participate in the management of respiratory and/or cardiovascular emergencies and cardiopulmonary arrest in pediatric patients. This includes personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care and critical care units such as physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, pharmacists and paramedics.

COURSE COVERS

•The systematic approach to assess and treat a seriously ill or injured infant/child
• Recognition and management of cardiac arrest
• Basic child and infant life support skills
• Effective resuscitation team dynamics
• Recognition and management of respiratory distress and failure, including airway management
• Recognition and management of shock, including vascular access
• Recognition and management of arrhythmias, including electrical therapy • Post-cardiac arrest care